Aboriginal Owned & Operated

The name 'Kakadu' comes from an aboriginal floodplain language called Gagudju which was one of the languages spoken in the north of the park at the beginning of the twentieth century. Gagudju is no longer regularly spoken but descendants of this language group are still living in Kakadu.

Kakadu National Park and Arnhem Land comprise more than 110,000 square kilometres in the north-east corner of the Northern Territory. The landscapes of Kakadu are diverse and set the scene for outback adventure travel, aboriginal culture and nature activities.

Kakadu National Park is the largest national park in Australia. It contains one of the highest concentrated areas of aboriginal rock art sites in the world; the most famous examples are at Nourlangie Rock and Ubirr.

The secret to discovering Kakadu is taking your time. You'll find stories, secrets and sights never imagined. It is impossible to appreciate the full breadth and beauty of the park in a fleeting visit – if you can afford the time, spend a week or more.

Nature and wildlife abound in this area, which is known for its level of biodiversity. Wholly aboriginal owned land, Arnhem Land is known for its strong aboriginal culture, towering escarpments, wild coastline, savannah woodlands, lush wetlands and prolific wildlife. Closer to Darwin is the Mary River region, home to millions of birds, saltwater crocodiles and fish, including the mighty barramundi, which makes it a fishing hot spot.

The park was established in 1981. It is governed by Environment Australia / Parks Australia and Aboriginal traditional land owners (the Gun-djeihmi, Kunwinjku, Krakeourtinnie and Jawoyn peoples). The park has recently been accepted as a World-Heritage listing.

The park contains 1,980,400 hectacres of wetlands and other terrain. It is Australia's largest National Park and is approximately the size of Israel.


Kakadu is home to 68 mammals (almost one-fifth of Australia’s mammals), more than 120 reptiles, 26 frogs, over 300 tidal and freshwater fish species, more than 2 000 plants and over 10 000 species of insects. It provides habitat for more than 290 bird species (over one-third of Australia’s birds). Its internationally important wetlands are a major staging point for migratory birds. Some of these species are threatened or endangered. Many are found nowhere else in the world and there are still others yet to be discovered. The Creation Ancestors gave Bininj/Mungguy a kinship system linking people to all things and the cultural responsibility to look after them all. They have always understood the biodiversity of country and their traditional ancestral knowledge is a vital part of managing Kakadu’s rich environment.

The Habitats of Kakadu
Within the vast landscapes of Kakadu, there are six main landforms. Each landform and the habitats it contains has a range of plants and animals. As you move through Kakadu, take the time to explore and appreciate the diversity of the areas you visit - each one is truly unique.

  • Savanna Woodlands making up nearly 80 per cent of Kakadu.
  • Monsoon forests occur in small, isolated patches.
  • The Southern Hills appear in the south of Kakadu are the result of millions of years of erosion.
  • Sandstone escarpment Dominant in the Arnhem Land Plateau.
  • Coastal and estuarine areas take up almost 500 square kilometres of Kakadu
  • Floodplains undergo dramatic seasonal changes.

Following wet season rains, a sea of shallow freshwater spreads over the plains for hundreds of square kilometres. As the floodplains start to dry, waterbirds and crocodiles seek refuge in the remaining wet areas such as Yellow Water.

Flora and fauna
The park's wetlands provide the greatest visual pleasure. The freshwater and estaurine (saltwater) crocodiles sleep on the banks of all rivers and the many billabongs for most of the day but can also be seen floating or swimming in the water. Birdlife abounds from the stately Jabiru to the amusing "Jesus" bird (Jacana) as it steps from lily pad to lily pad. At dusk on the Yellow Water billabong (Ngurrungurrudjba), hundred of herons circle overhead landing and taking of from half-submerged trees. Ospreys sit on termite mounds or soar on high looking for prey beneath the still waters. The billabongs of the Kakadu national park are anything but "stagnant pools of water". Wallabies are very common and are often, unfortunately, seen as roadkill. Feral horses, pigs and water buffalo also roam the park. Frilled Lizards are also present but are only regularly seen during the wet season when the park is nearly inaccessible.

Contact KCT

Freecall: 1800 525 238

Email: kctres@kakadu.net.au

Contact Anbinik

61 8 89793144

Email: anbinik@kakadu.net.au


Trip Advisor

Kakadu Cultural Tours and Anbinik Kakadu Resort are owned and operated by Djabulukgu Association representing the Traditional Owners of Northern Kakadu and parts of Western Arnhem Land.

You will enjoy exclusive access to country and sites specialising in Aboriginal cultural & nature based cruises, tours & wilderness lodge accommodation in this World Heritage Area.

Guests travel in small groups by comfortable 4WD vehicles & boats, escorted by expert guides, predominantly Aboriginal, ensuring high standards of service & a unique cultural experience.